Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Series of Immigration Resources

Immigration resources
Perryman’s work-- An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Undocumented Workers on Business Activity in the US with Estimated Effects by State and by Industry
ARIZONA’S PUNISHMENT DOESN’T FIT THE CRIME: More flaws in the Arizona laws:
Texas Comptroller’s Excellent Study of the benefits to Texas of immigrants:
https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0By-S7ktkhYqwYTFkY2ZkNGEtNjA3My00ZDNmLWFkMDAtOTgwMjhhMTIzMmQ5&hl=en

Ten Myths Around Immigration and Immigrants


  Immigrants don't want to learn English
FALSE
The development of English proficiency among non-English speaking immigrants today mirrors that of Nineteenth and early Twentieth century immigration, when masses of Italian, German, and Eastern European immigrants came to America.  While first generation, non-English speaking immigrants predictably have lower rates of English proficiency than native speakers, 91% of second generation immigrants are fluent or near fluent English speakers.  By the third generation, 97% speak English fluently or near fluently. 
(Source: Shirin Hakimzadeh and D'Vera Cohn, "English Usage Among Hispanics in the United States," Pew Hispanic Forum, Dec. 6, 2007. http://pewhispanic.org/reports/report.php?ReportID=82; Janet Murguia and Cecilia Muñoz, "From Immigrant to Citizen," The American Prospect (Oct. 23, 2005), http://www.prospect.org/cs/articles?articleId=10487)

Immigrants Don't Pay Taxes
FALSE
Undocumented immigrants pay taxes.  Between one half and three quarters of undocumented immigrants pay state and federal taxes.  They also contribute to Medicare and provide as much as 7 billion dollars a year to the Social Security Fund.  Further still, undocumented workers pay sales taxes where applicable and property taxes—directly if they own and indirectly if they rent.   
(Source: Immigration Policy Center, "Undocumented Immigrants as Taxpayers," (November 2007), http://www.ailf.org/ipc/factchecks/UndocumentedasTaxpayer.pdf; Eduardo Porter " Illegal Immigrants are Bolstering Social Security with Billions," New York Times, (April 5, 2005), http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/05/business/05immigration.html?ex=1270353600&en=78c87ac4641dc383&ei=5090&partner=kmarx)

Immigrants Increase the Crime rate
FALSE
Recent research has shown that immigrant communities do not increase the crime rate and that immigrants commit fewer crimes than native born Americans.  While the undocumented immigrant population doubled from 1994 to 2005, violent crime dropped by 34% and property crimes decreased by 32%.  Furthermore, Harvard sociologist Robert Sampson has found that first generation immigrants are 45% less likely to commit violent crimes than Americanized, third generation immigrants.
(Source: Immigration Policy Center, "Ímmigrants and Crime: Are They Connected," December, 2007, http://www.ailf.org/ipc/factchecks/CrimeFactCheck10-16-07.pdf; Robert Sampson, "Open Doors Don't Invite Criminals," The New York Times, March 11, 2006, A15; Executive Office of the President: Council of Economic Advisors, "Immigration's Economic Impact," June 20, 2007, http://www.whitehouse.gov/cea/cea_immigration_062007.html)

Immigrants Take Jobs Away from Americans
False
 A recent study produced by the Pew Hispanic Center reveals that "Rapid increases in the foreign-born population at the state level are not associated with negative effects on the employment of native-born workers." In fact, given that the number of native born low wage earners is falling nationally, immigrants are playing an important role in offsetting that decline.  The Urban Institute reports that between 2000 and 2005 the total number of low wage workers declined by approximately 1.8 million while the number of unskilled immigrant workers increased by 620,000, thus offsetting the total decline by about a third.   
 (Source: The Urban Institute, "Trends in the Low-Wage Immigrant Labor Force, 2000-2005," March, 2007, http://www.urban.org/publications/411426.html; Rakesh Kochhar, "Growth in the Foreign Born Workforce and Employment of the Native Born," Pew Hispanic Center, August 10, 2006, http://pewhispanic.org/reports/report.phpReportID=69)

Immigrants are a drain on the United States Economy
False
The immigrant community is not a drain on the U.S. economy but, in fact, proves to be a net benefit.  Research reported by both the CATO Institute and the President's Council of Economic Advisors reveals that the average immigrant pays a net 80,000 dollars more in taxes than they collect in government services. For immigrants with college degrees the net fiscal return is $198,000.  Furthermore, The American Farm Bureau asserts that without guest workers the U.S. economy would lose as much as $9 billion a year in agricultural production and 20 percent of current production would go overseas.
 (Source: CATO Institute, CATO Handbook for Congress: Policy Recommendations for the 108th Congress,http://www.cato.org/pubs/handbook/hb108/hb108-63.pdf; Executive Office of the President: Council of Economic Advisors, "Immigration's Economic Impact," June 20, 2007, http://www.whitehouse.gov/cea/cea_immigration_062007.html; Derrick Z. Jackson, "Undocumented Workers Contribute Plenty, The Boston Globe, April 12, 2006, http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2006/04/12/undocumented_workers_contribute_plenty/)

Undocumented immigrants are a Burden on the Healthcare System
False
 Federal, state and local governments spend approximately 1.1 billion dollars annually on healthcare costs for undocumented immigrants, aged 18-64, or approximately $11 in taxes for each U.S. household.  This compares to 88 billion dollars spent on all health care for non-elderly adults in the U.S. in 2000.  Foreign born individuals tend to use fewer health care services because they are relatively healthier than their native born counterparts.  For example, in Los Angeles County, "total medical spending on undocumented immigrants was $887 million in 2000 – 6 percent of total costs, although undocumented immigrants comprise 12 percent of the region's residents."
 (Source: The Rand Corporation, "RAND Study Shows Relatively Little Public Money Spent Providing Healthcare to Undocumented Immigrants," November 14, 2006, http://www.rand.org/news/press.06/11.14.html; Dana P. Goldman, James P. Smith and Neeraj Sood, "Immigrants and the Cost of Medical Care," Health Affairs 25, no. 6 (2006): 1700-1711)


The Economic Benefits of Comprehensive Immigration Reform

Raising the Floor for American Workers
The Economic Benefits of Comprehensive Immigration Reform
 SOURCE: AP/Mark Lennihan
Comprehensive immigration reform that legalizes currently unauthorized immigrants and
creates flexible legal limits on future immigration in the context of full labor rights would
help American workers and the U.S. economy.
By Dr. Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda | January 7, 2010

The U.S. government has attempted for more than two decades to put a stop to unauthorized immigration from and through Mexico by implementing “enforcement-only” measures along the U.S.-Mexico border and at work sites across the country. These measures have failed to end unauthorized immigration and placed downward pressure on wages in a broad swath of industries.

Comprehensive immigration reform that legalizes currently unauthorized immigrants and creates flexible legal limits on future immigration in the context of full labor rights would help American workers and the U.S. economy. Unlike the current enforcement-only strategy, comprehensive reform would raise the “wage floor” for the entire U.S. economy—to the benefit of both immigrant and native-born workers.

The historical experience of legalization under the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act indicates that comprehensive immigration reform would raise wages, increase consumption, create jobs, and generate additional tax revenue. Even though IRCA was implemented during an economic recession characterized by high unemployment, it still helped raise wages and spurred increases in educational, home, and small-business investments by newly legalized immigrants. Taking the experience of IRCA as a starting point, we estimate that comprehensive immigration reform would yield at least $1.5 trillion in cumulative U.S. gross domestic product over 10 years. This is a compelling economic reason to move away from the current “vicious cycle” where enforcement-only policies perpetuate unauthorized migration and exert downward pressure on already low wages, and toward a “virtuous cycle” of worker empowerment in which legal status and labor rights exert upward pressure on wages.

This report uses a computable general equilibrium model to estimate the economic ramifications of three different scenarios: 1) comprehensive immigration reform that creates a pathway to legal status for unauthorized immigrants in the United States and establishes flexible limits on permanent and temporary immigration that respond to changes in U.S. labor demand in the future; 2) a program for temporary workers only that does not include a pathway to permanent status or more flexible legal limits on permanent immigration in the future; and 3) mass deportation to expel all unauthorized immigrants and effectively seal the U.S.-Mexico border. The model shows that comprehensive immigration reform produces the greatest economic benefits:
·  Comprehensive immigration reform generates an increase in U.S. GDP of at least 0.84 percent. Summed over 10 years, this amounts to a cumulative $1.5 trillion in additional GDP. It also boosts wages for both native-born and newly legalized immigrant workers.
·  The temporary worker program generates an increase in U.S. GDP of 0.44 percent. This amounts to $792 billion of cumulative GDP over 10 years. Moreover, wages decline for both native-born and newly legalized immigrant workers.
·  Mass deportation reduces U.S. GDP by 1.46 percent. This amounts to $2.6 trillion in cumulative lost GDP over 10 years, not including the actual cost of deportation.2 Wages would rise for less-skilled native-born workers, but would diminish for higher-skilled natives, and would lead to widespread job loss.

Legalizing the nation’s unauthorized workers and putting new legal limits on immigration that rise and fall with U.S. labor demand would help lay the foundation for robust, just, and widespread economic growth.

Contact List of Valley Leadership Against Anti-Immigrant Legislation


First Name
Last Name
Association
Contact
Amaris
Garcia
Congressman Cuellar
amaris.garcia@mail.house.gov
Ray
Prewett
Citrus Mutual
ray@valleyag.org
Rev. Jerry
Frank
Valley Interfaith
jerrywfrank@yahoo.com
Elliot
Tucker
South Texas Civil Rights Project
elliott.tucker.tcrp@gmail.com
Rev. Alfonso
Guevarra
Bishop Flores
mendezguevara@aol.com
Michael
Leu
Hidalgo County Judge
michael.leu@co.hidalgo.tx.us
Ann
Williams Cass
Equal Voice/Proyecto Azteca
AnnWCass@aol.com
Jose
Medrano
Equal Voice/START
jmedrano@startcenter.org
John Michael
Torres
Equal Voice/LUPE
johnmichael@lupenet.org
Arturo
Ramirez
CEO
CEOLRG@utxb.com
Armando
Garza
Equal Voice/Proyecto Azteca
agarza@proyectoazteca.com
Martha
Sanchez
Equal Voice/LUPE
martas@lupenet.org
Neha
Singhal
Equal Voice/LUPE
neha@lupenet.org
Esmeralda
Zuniga
Texas Organizing Project
ezuniga@organizetexas.org
Alex
Garrido
UTPA Dream
jossealex88@hotmail.com
Jorge
Compret
UTPA Dream
dupres@hotmail.com
Maggie

Rio Grande Guardian
mmercato26@yahoo.com
Paula
Gomez
BCHC
paulasgomez@sbcglobal.net
Josemaria
Vazquez
AGIFof the USA
americangiforum@att.net
Alix
Flores
Equal Voice/BCHC
alixflores@sbcglobal.net
Orlando
Salinas
Rep. Aaron Peña
orlando.salinas@house.state.tx.us
Enrique
Perez
TX AgriLIfe Extension Service
e-perez@tamu.edu
Ruben
Saldana
TX AgriLIfe Extension Service
rjsaldaña@ag.tamu.edu
Carlos
Robledo

caldanR@yahoo.com
Brittney
Booth
Rep Veronica Gonzales
brittney.Booth@house.state.tx.us
Sr. Phylis
Peters
Equal Voice/Proyecto Juan Diego
phylispeters@gmail.com
Lupita
Sanchez
Equal Voice/Proyecto Juan Diego
lupita.sanchezmartinez@gmail.com
Adriana
Guerrero
Equal Voice/Proyecto Juan Diego
delgadina1963@hotmail.com
Cynthia
Sakulenzki
RGV Hispanic Chamber
cynthia@rgvhcc.com
Steve
Taylor
Rio Grande Guardian
staylor@riogrnadeguardian.com
Ramona
Casas
Equal Voice/ARISE
ariseadvocacy@att.net
Paula
Barrera
Equal Voice/Proyecto Juan Diego
paulabarrera17@yahoo.com
Alexis
Gallegos
Congressman Henry Cuellar
alexis.gallegos@mail.house.gov
Salomon
Torres
Congressman Ruben Hinojosa
Salomon.Torres@mail.house.gov
Linda
McKenna
RGV Partnership
linda@valleychamber.com
Ninfa
Kruegar
BARCA
rgvbarca@aol.com
Rev Linda
Whitworth-Reed
Greater McAllen Ministerial Alliance
linda@fpcmcallen.com
Pat
Mayer
Task Force on Immigration Mission Presbytery
pjmoyer2005@sbcglobal.net
Ed
Kruegar
Comite de Apoyo
comitedeapoyo@aol.com